Knee Strike

PART II

 Knees are best delivered while grabbing the opponent and pulling the target area towards the striking instrument, however, they can be delivered without grabbing. Jumping into the air while delivering a knee strike can add power to the technique. Standing on tip-toes or the ball of one's foot while delivering a knee strike with the other leg is unique to this art.

  It is believed that doing so adds power to the technique and increases the reach of the attacking leg. Both knees can strike straight upwards simultaneously towards the chest, head, shoulders, or solar plexus of the opponent and such a technique is called the double knee.

The fighter grabs his opponent by the head and prepares himself to attack. A The technique is completed as the fighter launches his self forward and attacks his opponent with a jumping right knee strike aimed at the chest or head. B The fighter prepares his self to attack his opponent with a left knee strike, the left knee is raised and brought from the outside in a circular motion.. . A
     
,,,The technique is completed as the fighter slams his left  knee inwards to strike the opponents upper or lower right  ribs. B With a twist of the hip, and using the point of the knee, the fighter delivers a spearing left  knee strike  to his opponents lower right ribs With a twist of the hip, and using the point of the knee, the fighter delivers a spearing left  knee strike  to his opponents upper outside right thigh.

 

 Using the point of the knee, the fighter delivers a spearing left  knee strike  to his opponents upper front right thigh.

Using the point of the knee, the fighter delivers a raising left  knee strike  to his opponents upper inside right thigh.

  Every knee strike is delivered with the twisting of the hips and the turning of the waist. There is an elevating maneuver in which one leg is used to step upon one of the opponent's thighs acting as the elevating support while the other leg executes a knee. Sometimes, one hand is used for grabbing the opponent's neck or shoulder so that balance is maintained during execution. 

Artwork by C. Heyliger 2000

    

Copyright 1998 USMTA Inc.   All rights reserved. Revised: October 16, 2004