WEAPONS OF THAILAND...            PAGE 2

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The dance of the weapons is essential to Por Kruh's teaching and the student will spend much time perfecting it under his watchful eye. Some sets include a kneeling form as well as a standing one.  The dance follows the close spiritual traditions of  Thailand.  One also sees the importance of dancing in the Indonesian arts of Pentjak Silat and Kun Tao as well. Weapons will be changed from session to session, morning might be a single sword session with the afternoon being staff and evening double swords.  One must clear his mind and flow with the heavy demands made on the practitioner.  It is only through self determination, perseverance and will can the mastery of Krabi Krabong come.

A practitioner will learn a dance for each of the traditional weapons. The ritual dances - Wai Kruh, Kheun Phrom, Lod Lor and Dern Plaeng are an integral part of the system. These sets are often accompanied by timed drum beats. The appropriate tempo matching the actions displayed. In actual demonstrations a set of musical instruments (Pi'Chawa, Ching and Glong Kaek) are often employed just as in Muay Thai. Combat sets for each weapon are simultaneously taught. At times with the rattan and  other times with the steel.

Then different weapons are matched against one another such as Plong versus Mai Sun Sawk. Mass attack and self defense are also taught in addition to empty hand against any of the above mentioned weapons.  In the mornings, when the bigger classes of children attend the Buddhai Sawan, there are Buddhist meditation and chanting for half an hour before training begins in the first cycle from 9am - 12 noon, then again from 1pm until 4pm and finally for those living inside the temple from 7pm until 9pm.

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Por Kru Samai recieves a plaque from the King of Thailand

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photo by T. Moore 1997

photo by T. Moore 1995

photo by T. Moore 1995

    

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